Steering Committee

The Community Climate Intervention Strategies (CCIS) steering committee consists of members from a diverse background. They include a local team at NCAR & UCAR as well as members from Universities and other organizations.

Learn more about the members below.

NCAR & UCAR local Steering Committee

Simone Tilmes
Simone Tilmes

Simone is a project scientist at ACOM, NCAR and is leading the CCIS project. Her interests cover the understanding and evaluation of chemical, aerosol and dynamical processes in chemistry-climate models. She has been studying the impact of solar radiation management, in particular stratospheric aerosol geoengineering, on the Earth’s climate system, the hydrological cycle, sea-ice, and the impact on dynamics and chemistry.

Peter Lawrence
Peter Lawrence

Peter is a Project Scientist in the Terrestrial Sciences Section within the Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory at NCAR. His research investigates how human and natural systems respond to the world's changing climate, and how human activities in turn impact back on the climate system. At NCAR he is a leading scientist on land use and land cover change. He serves as a member of the scientific steering committee of the Land Use Modeling Intercomparison Project. More details can be found on his NCAR webpage.

Monica Morrison
Monica Morrison

Monica is an Advanced Study Program postdoctoral researcher at National Center for Atmospheric Research in the Climate and Global Dynamics Laboratory. She received her PhD in Philosophy from Indiana University, specializing in philosophy of science, with a minor in physical geography. Her interests include Earth system model development, scientific modeling and representation, model pluralism and integration, values in science, and scientific co-production and interdisciplinarity.

Andreas Prein
Andreas Prein

Andreas Prein is a Project Scientist II at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, USA. He works with the Capacity Center for Climate and Weather Extremes (C3WE) in the Mesoscale & Microscale Meteorology Laboratory (MMM).

Prein holds a Ph.D. in Physics and a Master in Environmental System Sciences from the University of Graz in Austria. He is a guest editor for the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, a panel member of the GEWEX Hydroclimatology Panel (GHP), and helps to coordinate international community activities in the area of kilometer-scale climate modeling.

Brian Medeiros
Brian Medeiros

Brian studies clouds and moist processes in the atmosphere, including cloud feedbacks and climate sensitivity. In this work he develops, runs, and analyzes climate models across a hierarchy of configurations.

Britt Stephens
Britt Stephens

Britt is a Senior Scientist at the Research Aviation Facility with the Earth Observing Laboratory at NCAR. His research focuses on developing and deploying instruments for tower, ship, and aircraft-based observations of atmospheric O2 and CO2, and on synthesizing data sets and models to study the global carbon cycle. Britt's carbon-cycle interests span terrestrial ecology, oceanography, atmospheric dynamics, and climate change mitigation.

Andrea Smith
Andrea Smith

Andrea Smith holds a BS and MS in Atmospheric Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. She has previously been a lecturer at various universities and currently works as an instructional designer and program manager for UCAR’s COMET Program. She designs a wide variety of online instructional materials and immersive classroom experiences for geoscience professionals across the globe.

Roy Rasmussen
Roy Rasmussen

Roy Rasmussen received a B.S. degree in Physics and Mathematics from Wheaton College, Illinois in 1978, and a Masters and PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles in Atmospheric Sciences in 1980 and 1982, respectively, specializing in cloud physics. After receiving his doctorate, he was an Advanced Study Program postdoctoral researcher at National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). He is currently a Senior Scientist and director of the Hydrometeorology Applications Program at the Research Applications Laboratory at NCAR. He is an American Meteorological Society Fellow and has ten patents and over 150 peer reviewed journal papers.

Brian Medeiros
Wojtek Grabowski

Wojciech W. Grabowski is a Polish-American atmospheric physicist. Grabowski works at the National Center for Atmospheric Physics in Boulder, USA. He specializes in numerical modeling of atmospheric processes, numerical geophysics methods, convection and cloud microphysics.

He graduated from the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw. Grabowski holds a doctorate in atmospheric physics and obtained his habilitation at the Institute of Geophysics of the Polish Academy of Sciences.

His greatest achievements include proposing a new class of cloud parameterization in climate models. He was also the author of new numerical techniques in weather forecasting. He deals with cloud microphysics and understanding droplet collision processes in turbulent conditions and the development of convection in the atmosphere. He has published several dozen scientific articles.

Tim Barnes
Tim Barnes

After training in advanced naval avionics, Tim earned a B.A. in Communication, and helped pioneer Vagal Tone Monitor use as undergraduate R.A. with the Dept. of Child Clinical Psychology at CU Boulder. Tim is currently a Councilor with the City of Lafayette, CO and, for a quarter century has worked in the UCAR Center for Science Education, interacting with non-experts, from various knowledge and belief backgrounds to facilitate productive exchange of verbal and non-verbal information about the Earth system sciences, through analogue, metaphor and storytelling. He also co-facilitates the NCAR Undergraduate Leadership workshop.

External Members of the Steering Committee

Deborah Lawrence
Anton Seimon
Bard College Center for Environmental Policy

Anton leads research programs on diverse themes in atmospheric and environmental sciences such as climate change impacts in the tropical Andes, tornadoes on the US Great Plains, and working with conservationists to plan for climate change in tropical Africa using NCAR models. He is also active in science media, developing content for National Geographic and as a juror for the New York WILD Film Festival. He teaches climate science to graduate students at the Center for Environmental Policy at Bard College in New York State.

Deborah Lawrence
Deborah Lawrence
University of Virginia

Deborah Lawrence, Ph.D., is a Professor of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on the links between tropical deforestation and climate change. She has spent the past twenty-five years doing field-based research in Indonesia, Costa Rica, Mexico and Cameroon. Most recently, she has been using global climate models to explore the cumulative effect of tropical land use decisions, exploring the climate impact of land allocation among food crops, biofuels and forests across the globe. Professor Lawrence and her students conduct interdisciplinary research with partners in hydrology, atmospheric science, economics, anthropology, ethics, engineering, and law to understand the drivers and consequences of land use change.

Doug MacMartin
Doug MacMartin
Cornell University

Douglas MacMartin runs the Climate Engineering research program at Cornell University, focusing primarily on stratospheric aerosol intervention, including how outcomes depend on “design” choices or strategies, on scenarios, and beginning a more systematic assessment of uncertainty. He has a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT in 1992.

Dale Rothman
Dale Rothman
George Mason University / University of Denver

Holds a SB in Earth Sciences from MIT and a PhD in Resource and Environmental Economic from Cornell University. He has worked at a number of academic and research institutions in the US, Canada, and Europe. His research focuses on the use of scenario development and integrated modeling as applied to social-ecological systems.

Greeshma Gadikota
Greeshma Gadikota
Cornell University

Dr. Greeshma Gadikota is an Assistant Professor and Croll Sesquicentennial Fellow in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University where she directs the Sustainable Energy and Resource Recovery Group. She is the recipient of the DOE CAREER award and serves as the thrust lead for dynamic characterization for the DOE EFRC Multi-Scale Fluid-Solid Interactions in Natural and Architected Materials (MUSE). She was selected as the Rising Stars in Civil and Environmental Engineering by MIT. Prior to Cornell, Dr. Gadikota served on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and was a postdoctoral research associate at Princeton University and Columbia University, with a research appointment at the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST). Dr. Gadikota received her PhD in Chemical Engineering and earned her MS degrees in Chemical Engineering and Operations Research, all from Columbia University. Her BS in Chemical Engineering is from Michigan State University.

Gyami Shrestha
Gyami Shrestha
U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program

Dr. Gyami Shrestha has been directing the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office activities for the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group (CCIWG) since 2011. The Program's portfolio catalyzes coordinated scientific advances and U.S. government strategies in collaboration with the U.S. and international science community, via mainly the North American Carbon Program (NACP) and the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program (OCB) as well as other organizations.

Karen Rosenlof
Karen Rosenlof
NOAA

Karen Rosenlof is a civil servant in the NOAA Chemical Sciences Laboratory and leads the Chemistry and Climate Processes Group. Her expertise is in the interpretation of stratospheric water vapor and ozone data. She uses constituent and temperature measurements in conjunction with modes of varying complexity to understand dynamical processes. In particular, her work has concentrated on understanding trends and variability of the stratospheric transport circulation. She has participated in numerous research aircraft missions, serving as a flight forecaster and mission planner. She has been involved in a number of satellite/correlative measurement comparisons including co-chairing the SPARC water vapor assessment. She has also participated in international ozone trends activities, served as a co-author for WMO ozone and IPCC assessments and is currently a co-leads for the SPARC water vapour assessment activity (WAVAS-II).